USA: IMAGES OF ALASKA

It’s good to see the old pioneer spirit is alive and kicking here in Alaska. From the back of Valdez we take a walk up the track beside Mineral Creek. It draws us into a steep-sided valley, the sun that we have finally been blessed with sparkling on the late-morning dew. In only a few kilometres we find Steve and his grandson, five year old John. They’ve stopped to allow the steel tracks on the excavator to cool. Steve is driving the machine to the top of the creek, where he’ll begin work on his 300 acre gold stake. He’s hoping to make a fortune pretty quickly … or at least dig out sufficient gold to get his fishing boat back to sea. He reckons that by next spring he should have plenty – otherwise he might be in big trouble. He laughs and strokes his chin and I suspect he might have been in big trouble a few times. At 67 years old Steve appears undeterred by the fact he’s already been struck down four times with a heart attack.

‘I’ve been suffering from a shortage of breath,’ he explains. ‘Each time I lifted a shovel I couldn’t breath. Doc wanted me back in hospital for another heart job.’

Instead of going to the hospital Steve went off and bought himself four bottles of Cardio Vital Plus. ‘I just flushed me veins out,’ he says, grinning and sending John scurrying into the bushes to gather berries.

Steve swears the combination of the Cardio Vital Plus and some strange machine he’s bought that emits radio waves have given him a new lease of life.

‘I don’t get no more trouble now,’ he says, telling us with some pride how the local Indians all call him the Medicine Man.

In his time Steve has been a farmer, a road constructor, a builder, a fisherman and now a gold prospector. He flashes a scar on his hand where he fended off a knife-wielding mugger in Fairbanks. He arrived in Fairbanks thirty years ago because a friend told him the parties there were wild and the work was hard. He never looked back; life was good. Later, when he pitched up here in Valdez he only had 27 dollars and 50 cents in his pocket.

‘I just started all over again,’ he says.

As I listen to Steve talking I run an eye over the clothes he’s wearing. I’m quite sure it’s his ex-wife’s T-shirt he’s got on. It’s a frilly, black affair, too baggy under the arms and across the chest and stretched way too tight over the belly. Not that it matters in the least. Not out here. A Victorinox knife pokes from the pocket of his jeans. The kid comes bounding back with a handful of blueberries, ripe and sweet. We talk a bit more until Steve says, ‘Well, we best git a bit further up that road.’ As Steve and John clamber aboard their excavator we turn round and walk back in the direction of Valdez.

The weather dealt us a lowly hand of cards during our four week tour of Alaska. Some days the light was so bad and the cloud so low we took to snapping photos in black and white, just to see how it would work out. The following are our images of Alaska.

LLL
SHORTLY AFTER CROSSING THE CANADIAN/US BORDER WE ROLL UP AT THE SETTLEMENT OF CHICKEN. THIS IS AN OLD GOLD PROSPECTING TOWN. TODAY IT HAS A POPULATION OF 23 IN THE SUMMER, AND 7 IN THE WINTER. CHICKEN WAS SUPPOSEDLY NAMED BY THE FIRST MINERS TO COME HERE. THAY WANTED TO CALL IT PTARMIGAN, WHICH IS WHAT THEY ATE THE MOST OF, EXCEPT PTARMIGAN WAS JUST TOO DARN DIFFICULT TO SPELL, SO THEY SETTLED ON CALLING THE PLACE CHICKEN.
LLL
WHITTIER HARBOUR. THIS IS A COMMON SIGHT IN ALASKA. THERE ARE FISH FILLETING BENCHES EVERYWHERE AND EVERYBODY IS ITCHING TO GO FISHING. TO ACCESS WHITTIER YOU DRIVE THROUGH A TWO MILE TUNNEL THAT IS SHARED WITH THE RAILROAD SERVICE. THE RAILROAD TRACKS ARE SUNK INTO THE SINGLE TRACK ROAD. WHEN YOU HEAD OFF INTO THE DARKNESS YOU JUST HAVE TO HOPE THE GUY IN CHARGE HASN’T ALSO GONE FISHING.
KKK
EARLY EVENING AND TIME TO GO FISHING. I SNAPPED THIS FROM THE WHITTIER INN, JUST BEFORE A ROUND OF HALIBUT AND CHIPS AND A PINT OF ALSAKA SUMMER.
KKK
ALASKAN ART. (WHITTIER)
JJJ
THIS IS WHAT BECOMES OF THE FOREST SOME TIME AFTER A WILDFIRE. THE TREES ARE LEFT LOOKING LIKE A COLLECTION OF PORCUPINE QUILLS STUCK IN THE GROUND. LAST YEAR ALASKA SUFFERED A LOT OF WILDFIRES.
HHH
HOMER, LOCATED ON THE SOUTHWESTERN KENAI PENINSULA IS AN ARTY KIND OF PLACE. HOMER CALLS ITSELF THE “HALIBUT FISHING CAPITAL OF THE WORLD”.
HHH
MORE HOMER ARTWORK ON THE SIDE OF THIS HOUSE.
KKK
LOOKING ACROSS THE KACHEMAK BAY TO THE KENAI MOUNTAINS. A COOL WIND WAS BLOWING THAT DAY AND THE SMELL OF THE SEA WONDERFUL. WE PARKED HERE FOR LUNCH. (HOMER)
JJJ
A SETTLEMENT IN THE KENAI PENINSULAR, OVERLOOKING THE COOK INLET.
KKK
KENAI PENINSULA AND THE HOLY TRANSFIGURATION OF OUR LORD RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH.
KKK
THE COOK INLET.
PPP
VALDEZ HARBOUR. IN VALDEZ WE TOOK TO SHOOTING IN BLACK AND WHITE THE WEATHER WAS SO DULL.
LLL
HIGH AND (NOT SO) DRY IN VALDEZ.
LLL
THE TRANS-ALASKAN PIPELINE COMES FROM PRUDHOE BAY UP ON THE NORTH COAST (ARCTIC OCEAN) AND ENDS UP DOWN HERE IN VALDEZ. AFTER THE EXXON VALDEZ DISASTER ALL TANKERS ARE NOW CLOSELY MONITORED. WE TOOK A BOAT RIDE TO VISIT THE COLUMBIA GLACIER. THIS BAY WAS FULL OF SEA OTTERS.
KKK
TINKERING AFTER A DAY’S FISHING. (VALDEZ HARBOUR)
LLL
FILLETING THE CATCH. (VALDEZ HARBOUR)
LLL
A SEA OTTER WALLOWING IN VALDEZ HARBOUR.
PPP
VALDEZ’S ECONOMY DEPENDS ON THE OIL INDUSTRY, THE PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND FISHERY, GOVERNMENT AND TOURISM. THE ORIGINAL TOWN WAS WIPED OUT BY AN EARTHQUAKE IN THE PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND IN 1964.
OOO
A PUFFIN ATTEMPTING TO WALK ON WATER.
LLL
SEA LION COLONY NEAR THE COLUMBIA GLACIER.
LLL
SUNBATHING ON A NAVIGATION BUOY. THERE ISN’T ROOM FOR EVERYONE. “SLING YER HOOK, DUDE!”
LLL
NEGOTIATING THE BROKEN ICE ON THE WAY TO THE COLUMBIA GLACIER.
KKK
THE VALDEZ GLACIER. IN THE DAYS OF THE KLONDIKE GOLD RUSH MANY OF THE STAMPEDERS CAME TO GRIEF WHILST CROSSING THESE GLACIERS.
HHH
THE KENNICOTT COPPER MINE. FINANCED BY THE GUGGENHEIM AND JP MORAN FAMILIES, THE KENNECOTT MINES COMPANY OPENED IN 1906. LONG SINCE ABANDONED, SOME OF THESE HISTORIC BUILDINGS ARE BEING SLOWLY RESTORED.
LLL
THIS IS THE RESULT OF A BEAR EATING WAY TOO MANY BERRIES. THE “WAGON TRAIL” WALK, WHICH CUTS THROUGH THE FOREST BETWEEN KENNICOTT AND MCCARTHY, WAS LITTERED WITH FRESH BEAR POO. IT WAS A VERY BAD TIME TO HAVE LEFT OUR BEAR SPRAY IN THE CAR. BEARS RUN AS FAST AS A HORSE, MAKING IT FUTILE TO TRY AND OUTRUN THEM. AND THEY CLIMB TREES PRETTY WELL, TOO.
PPP
THE “FLOATING “MOUNTAIN. THE FOLLOWING ARE THREE DIFFERENT VIEWS OF THE WRANGELL MOUNTAINS …
LLL
… EARLY EVENING …
KKK
… AND MID-DAY.
LLL
A MOOSE CALF FEEDING BESIDE THE ROAD.
PPP
THE YANKEES REALLY LOVE THEIR GUNS AND HATE THEIR ROAD SIGNS. WHEN A ROUND OF BUCKSHOT ISN’T SUFFICIENT TO GET THE JOB DONE …
KKK
… IT’S TIME TO REACH FOR SOMETHING A SHADE MORE SUBSTANTIAL.
LLL
THE KLUANE NATIONAL PARK.
JJJ
CATCHING SOME RAYS AFTER A LONG DAY ON THE ROAD.
HHH
WETLANDS BESIDE THE HAINES HIGHWAY. THE HAINES HIGHWAY COULD JUST AS WELL HAVE BEEN CALLED THE ENCHANTING HIGHWAY, SUCH WERE THE VIEWS.
KKK
ST ELIAS MOUNTAINS. (HAINES HIGHWAY)
LLL
A FAMILY OF RED FOXES BESIDE THE HAINES HIGHWAY.
LLL
MOTHER AND CUB.
KKK
HAINES.
LLL
FORT SEWARD, LOCATED JUST TO THE SOUTH OF HAINES CITY CENTRE. IT WAS NAMED FORT WILLIAM SEWARD, IN HONOUR OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE WHO NEGOTIATED THE PURCHASE OF ALASKA FROM RUSSIA IN 1867.
PPP
FISHERMEN IN THE CHILKOOT RIVER.
KKK
LOW TIDE IN THE CHILKAT INLET. (HAINES)
NNN
INDIAN ARTWORK ON ONE OF THE BUILDINGS IN FORT SEWARD, HAINES. FROM HAINES WE CATCH THE CAR FERRY TO JUNEAU, CAPITAL CITY OF ALASKA.
KKK
A TRAWLER RETURNING HOME. (JUNEAU)
OOO
A BALD EAGLE WAITING FOR THE TIDE TO TURN. (JUNEAU)
LLL
A BLACK BEAR HUNTING SALMON. (JUNEAU)
KKK
AND NOT FAR AWAY IS HER CUB.
KKK
THE MENDENHALL GLACIER. (JUNEAU)
KKK
FORMERLY THE A M GREGG REAL ESTATE OFFICE, THIS IS THE ONLY “STANDING” STRUCTURE REMAINING OF WHAT WAS FORMERLY THE TOWN OF DYEA. DYEA WAS A SMALL TRADING POST AND NATIVE VILLAGE BEFORE THE GOLD RUSH OF 1897. IN JUST A FEW MONTHS THE POPULATION BOOMED TO 8,000 WHEN IT BECAME A PRICIPAL PORT FOR THE KLONDIKE STAMPEDERS. TENTS AND SHACKS, OUTFITTING STORES, RESTAURANTS, HOTELS AND SALOONS ONCE STOOD ON THIS SITE. WHAT FEW RELICS REMAIN ARE DISAPPERAING BENEATH THE GROWING WOODLAND.
KKK
HYDER. A QUIET, RUNDOWN KIND OF A PLACE.
HHH
FROM JULY UNTIL MID-SEPTEMBER THE SALMON BEGIN ARRIVING IN THE RIVERS TO SPAWN. THEY RETURN TO THE RIVERS AND CREEKS WHERE THEY WERE BORN, AFTER SOME 3 TO 5 YEARS OUT AT SEA. THE GAUNTLET THEY MUST RUN IS QUITE FORMIDABLE. ORCA WHALES, GILL NETS, SEINERS, BEARS AND ANGLERS ARE JUST A FEW OF THE HAZARDS THEY ENCOUNTER ENROUTE TO THE SPAWNING GROUNDS.
JJJ
SHORTLY AFTER THEY SPAWN THE SALMON DIE AND LIE ROTTING IN THE CREEKS. THE SMELL GETS PRETTY PUNGENT.
HHH
THE SALMON GLACIER.
BBB
MAKING TRACKS ON THE SALMON GLACIER.
FEBRUARY 2012 IN SOUTHERN ARGENTINA. NOTICE IT IS 0NLY 17,848 KILOMETRES TO ALASKA AND YET IT TOOK US 100,000 KILOMETRES TO ALASKA. WHERE DID WE GO WRONG?
THIS WAS TAKEN IN FEBRUARY 2012 IN TIERRA DEL FUEGO, SOUTHERN ARGENTINA. NOTICE ON THE SIGN HOW IT IS ONLY 17,848 KILOMETRES TO ALASKA AND YET IT TOOK US 100,000 KILOMETRES TO GET THERE. WHERE DID WE GO WRONG?
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3 thoughts on “USA: IMAGES OF ALASKA

  1. I think the pictures and accompanying stories most interesting and very clear,which is amazing when you think how far they have travelled.some good stories for the various magsVML M.&D

    Sent from my iPad

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